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llower31

Paperwork

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It is imperative to cross all of your “T’s” and dot your “I’s.” Too many time has the office staff corrected many if not ALL of your paperwork. Including, FOLDING your paperwork (there’s an example of how to fold your paperwork on the wall right where you turn it in…). For a simple task that may take you 5 minutes of consideration, may take us 30 minutes to figure out what you did on a day to day basis. Please take the time, fill out your paperwork correctly and legibly.

Safety Blog

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Just a simple reminder to please make sure when you drop a trailer in the yard to keep the air and light connections off the ground. It is going to start getting wet, and sloppy in the yard and you want to ensure you have good clean connections.

This also applies to log truck trailers in that there can be accumulations of mud, snow or water where you keep your wrappers, and lay the connections at.

Lets have a safe winter! Lights on all the time!

Doug

MIND YOUR MANNERS – TRUCK STOP ETIQUETTE

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Trucking Industry, truck stop etiquette

TRUCK STOP ETIQUETTE

The truck stop is hands down the most important social hub of trucking. It’s a club that welcomes new recruits and reveres its elders for their miles and experience. A truck stop is an oasis of the road that offers entertainment and camaraderie while you fuel your truck and yourself. Whether you’re a new or experienced truck driver, there are a few rules to mind for your fellow drivers that even the best of us can grow lax on from time to time. Consider this a guide on truck stop manners for all of us.

The Golden Rule

Don’t: Park your truck at the fuel island while you go inside for a meal, shower, and paperwork.

Do: Fuel up the truck and then relocate the truck to an actual parking spot.

You don’t want to be the driver waiting on the guy parked at the fuel island, so don’t be that driver for somebody else. The same goes for every rule that follows.

The Other Golden Rule

Don’t: Leave behind “trucker bombs” in your overnight spot. Or anywhere else for that matter.

Do: Take your not-so-mellow yellow bottles into a restroom to properly dispose of the contents.

We all get it. Long hours on the road combined with drums of coffee leaves Mother Nature knocking when there isn’t a restroom for miles sometimes. If you’re too embarrassed to take it in, we recommend the book Everybody Poops. Remember the Scout rule to leave a place better than the way you found it.

Look Presentable

Don’t: Be confused for somebody from a Photos of Shame Hall of Fame.

Do: Put. Clothes. On.

Not every company has uniforms but many have dress codes. And even if yours doesn’t, take some pride in your profession and cover up.

Lend a Hand

Don’t: Wait for another trucker’s mistake to become your social media hit.

Do: Look out for other drivers and offer a lending hand.

Whether you’re new or old to the truck, life still happens outside of it to keep us distracted and tired. Everybody is going to have a slip up every once in a while. Do your best to offer a smile, with the benefit of the doubt, and kindly let a fellow driver know about a light out or signal them into a tight squeeze.

Make a Courtesy Call

Don’t: Accept night callers.

Do: Educate yourself about human trafficking and call for help.

Be aware of certain figures who move from truck to truck. Check out Truckers Against Trafficking and stick one of their free stickers in your cab window with the helpline info.

Chain Requirements

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Many of you may know, but if not, here’s a quick refresher. As of October 1st, 2019 all CMV must carry tire chains. At FV Martin, we carry them all year round. But, if you are hooking up to a trailer or driver a truck that is not typically yours, make sure they have tire chains (and chains that fit). Especially, if you are in a different truck and heading up into the woods. If you are unaware of the chaining requirements, see below;

Commercial Vehicles with Trailers

Vehicles with a GVW rating of 26,001 pounds or more that are towing one or more trailers. Single-drive axle commercial vehicles towing a trailer must have chains on two tires on each side of the drive axle and one tire on the front axle and one tire on one of the rear axles of the trailer.
Single-drive axle commercial vehicles towing a semi-trailer must have chains on two tires on each side of the drive axle and two tires, one on each side, of any axle of the semi-trailer.
Single-drive axle commercial vehicles towing both a semi-trailer and a trailer must have chains on two tires on each side of the drive axle, two tires, one on each side, of any axle of the semi-trailer, and one tire on the front axle and one tire on one of the rear axles of the trailer.
Tandem-drive axle commercial vehicles towing a trailer must have chains on two tires on each side of the primary drive axle; or if both axles of the vehicle are powered by the drive line, one tire on each side of each drive axle. Chains must also be placed on one tire of the front axle, and one tire on one of the rear axles of the trailer.
Tandem-drive axle commercial vehicles towing a semi-trailer must have chains on two tires on each side of the primary drive axle.
If both axles of the vehicle are powered by the drive line, one tire on each side of each drive axle. Chains must also be placed on two tires, one on each side, of any axle on the semi-trailer.
Tandem-drive axle commercial vehicles towing both a semi-trailer and a trailer must have chains on two tires on each side of the primary drive axle.
If both axles of the vehicle are powered by the drive line, one tire on each side of each drive axle. Chains must also be placed on two tires, one on each side of any axle on the semi-trailer and one tire on the front axle and one tire on one of the rear axles of the trailer.
Tandem-drive axle commercial vehicles towing a semi-trailer and a semi-trailer that are connected by kingpin-to-fifth wheel assembles, commonly referred to as a “B-Train” or connected by kingpin-to-fifth wheel “C-dolly” assemblies, commonly referred to as a “C-Train”, must have chains on two tires on each side of the primary drive axle.
If both axles of the vehicle are powered by the drive line, one tire on each side of each drive axle.
Chains must also be placed on two tires, one on each side, of any axle of the semi-trailer at the B-Train or C-Train connection and on two tires, one on each side, of any axle of the rear semi-trailer.

For questions regarding chain-up requirements for commercial vehicles, contact your local ODOT Port of Entry.

Bitch and Complain!!!!!

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You know sometimes you feel like the company or customer has done you wrong? You want to voice your opinion or vent, so to speak. Complain about the job or haul you are on or maybe the truck you are in.

Please keep in mind, not everyone feels that way.

It has been brought to our attention a few times in the last couple weeks by customers and coworkers that they are tired of hearing a couple of our drivers bitching and whining about little things.

I will explain this again. YOU DRIVERS are our advertising agency. The reason we stay busy and you work is because our customers love us. They love our dispatch. They love our drivers.  They love our business ethics.

They hate hearing you bad mouth their jobs their mills and their friends in our dispatch office.

I understand freedom of speech. I agree with it. That is why my phone rings 24 hours a day 7 days a week. My office door is also always open. You want to vent, come talk to me. Call me. I don’t have a problem telling you why we are doing something.

My cell phone number is posted in the driver’s room.

EROAD and fuel

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Please remember to input your fuel into EROAD every time you fuel. This includes yard fuel and outside fuel. If you need a refresher on where to input your fuel into EROAD, please come to the office and see Stew, Ryan or Heather.

Flatbedder’s

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As you know, the state of Oregon decided to go with the Federal rules on strapping veneer down. I had worked hard a few years ago and convinced Oregon that gut wrapping was not necessary. We were able to get away with it for years. Not any longer.

Just to let you know I am still working with the lead Administrator at the Oregon DOT Motor Carrier Division, Amy Ramsdale. We are trying to convince the Fed’s that Oregon needs an exemption.

Stay tuned!

Troy